Answering your questions about wind energy

Affordable Power

Wind energy is an affordable source of new electricity – costs are declining while efficiency is increasing.

Facts

  • Wind energy has successfully moved from a marginal alternative to among the lowest cost options for new electricity generation. Wind energy is now more cost-competitive than new coal, hydro and nuclear power. A 2014 report from the US investment firm Lazard found that wind energy is the lowest cost option for any new supply without any subsidies.
  • The fuel that turns the turbine blades is free; this means that once a wind farm is built, the price of electricity it produces is set and remains at that level for the entire life of the wind farm.
  • Traditional sources of energy are open to extreme price volatility, so the long-term cost-certainty and stabilizing effect of electricity rates from wind farms provide important protection for consumers.
  • The cost to build wind energy continues to decline, with dramatic drops over the past three years while significant efficiency gains are being realized in modern technology and siting.
  • Wind projects have very short construction periods and can be deployed quickly with positive impacts delivered to local communities.

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Amazing facts about the affordability of wind energy

Facts About Affordability Wind Energy

  • There is an urgent need to invest in new electricity generation and infrastructure after decades of underinvestment. According to the Conference Board of Canada, $347 billion in investment in Canada’s electricity system is required between now and 2030 – and all of these costs will be passed on to consumers.
  • According to the Ontario Energy Board, 45 per cent of the increase in Ontario's global adjustment since 2006 is due to nuclear power, while only 6 per cent of the increase is due to renewable energy
  • At its current rate of 11.5 cents per kWh in Ontario, wind energy is cost-competitive with all other new sources of electricity generation. Published reports peg nuclear’s all-in cost at anywhere between 25-28 cents/kwh.

Resources


Questions? We'll Answer

How does wind generate electricity?
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How is he government involved in the Wind power industries
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Why do turbine generated power, not receive the same rate per kWh as water, and nuclear plants?
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why is wind power a great source of energy
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what is wind energy ?
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Once the subsidies end (which right now make it barely feasible), will wind still be a viable option when there is no more money to dump on it?
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